So What Exactly is Augusta About?

Invasion of the Barbarians or The Huns approaching Rome - Color Painting
Attila, The Scourge of God– by Ulpiano Checa

In all my jabbering on about my baby Augusta, I never once took the time to actually explain (without spoilers, of course) the plot to this blasted thing. Sure, you know this is a pseudo-epic featuring Romans, dinosaurs, Attila the Hun, and a bunch of fantastical nonsense, but I never revealed anything concerning the actual story. Consider this my attempt to remedy that:

In days long past, the Roman Empire spread from the fringes of Scotland all the way to the expanse of Syria, but five hundred years of imperium over the West have taken their toll. Rome has split into two halves and limps the last leg of her race, beleaguered by threats from without and within. Upon the Pannonian steppe, a new empire has been born, one bred to usurp the old order. 

Spurred by the will of his battle-god, Attila rallies the hundred nations subjugated by the Huns to usher in a new age for all of Europe. Underneath remote Gallic mountains, a dragon brought low by an ancient curse stirs, once more contemplating rising from his treasure hoard to shape the world of Rome and Attila. Elsewhere, creatures from bygone ages once more prowl the wilds of war-worn Europe. Who brought them here and for what purpose, few mortals could ever say.

Into this world an exile from Italy is thrust. Some would say the blame for this impending war rests on her shoulders, and she would argue little with such charged accusations. The security of the ancient world hangs in the balance, and so this exile begins her quest for peace, for revenge, and for redemption at this ending of an age. To worlds older than our own she must travel, through the halls of hells below and through the clamor of war as the world of Antiquity is at long last unravelled.

The days of the ancient world are gone.

A new era rises with the coming dawn.

The Scourge of God has fallen upon the West.

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